• Sharebar

Author’s note: I’m sorry it’s taken so long to complete this series. There have been a few personal issues that have come up over the last couple of months that have taken a lot of my time; that combined with the fact I got distracted by other projects. Anyway, I hope you’ll find this last part was worth the wait and that you’ll come back for more updates soon (a LOT sooner from now on, I promise).

And so we come to the last day of what has been a fantastic event so far. Let’s not forget – it’s all about those 2 important ingredients, traffic and conversions.

Traffic and Conversion Summit

I was even more tired this morning (amazing how much attending one of these events can take out of you. I must not be used to all that mental concentration and attentiveness needed – been a while since I was in school!), but no less excited than the other days, and jumped into the car, excited at the prospect of learning a lot more tips and tricks to go with the mountain of info I’d compiled over the previous couple of days.

In The City

Fueled once again by lashings of hot coffee, I parked a lot nearer this time – a parking lot not far from a timeshare we have on Bush at Stockton. Unfortunately, I messed up the one-way system and ended up going the wrong way, so had to do a couple of circuits before I got to the garage entrance. And there I was thinking I was going to be on time!

Oh, well, after a brisk walk in lovely weather, I got there a few minutes after the start of the first session (missed my chance to win an iPad again – drat!) and grabbed a seat near the back.

Let The Day Begin

The first session is “Affiliate Armies” and is presented by a couple of snappy chappies named Vincent Fisher and Mark Jenny, 2 top affiliates. I’m definitely interested in this because, if you’re trying to sell something in the Internet Marketing niche, say on the Warrior Forum, one of the biggest keys to success you hear people talk about is getting affiliates to promote your offer. And if, like me, you’re not especially well known, that can be tricky.

So, what do Vincent and Mark have to say? Well, plenty, as it turns out, but here’s a brief review of what they covered:

  • Affiliates can scale your business – it’s not just you marketing your product
  • Focus on helping affiliates make more money – the more they make, the more you’ll make
  • It starts with a good offer that affiliates can get behind
  • Affiliates also look for a product that’s convert, good support and the highest possible payout
  • Don’t wait for affiliates to find you – GO OUT AND FIND THEM! Look at competitors (reverse engineer competitors – where do they get traffic (use Compete.com, Quantcast.com, AdBeat)?; get affiliate’s contact info and contact them; show proof of your converting offer), affiliate networks (Clickbank, Commission Junction, etc.), customers (your customers may be some of your best affiliates! May already be affiliates and will send you sales, or may like your product so much they refer it to a few friends), affiliates promoting other niches (may or may not be related to yours – good affiliates can sell anything!)
  • Commission payouts – pay affiliates as much as possible, but NEVER MISS A PAYMENT, or you may lose that affiliate forever.
  • Get a dedicated affiliate manager – good at customer relationship management, maintains affiliate database, keeps affiliates informed of latest offers, etc.
  • Make sure affiliate tools are in place and are of the highest quality (custom landing pages, emails, banners, etc.)
  • Get the most out of your affiliates by deepening your relationship with affiliates – communicate regularly (email, phone, Facebook, etc.), get to know them, add a personal touch (send a gift or something they’ll remember you for), offer prizes, frequent contests. BE CREATIVE AND STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD!

Fantastic information! That was a lot to take in, but I feel like I know a LOT more about what I need to do to get affiliates on board when I release a product. I hope you found one or two valuable pointers here.

Break time, so I went out to the lobby and mingled a bit and had a look around the various booths. I’m sure there are LOADS of well-known marketers here, and I’ve seen videos and photos of some of the bigger ones, but I can’t say I recognize any (i later found out there were indeed LOADS of top marketers around – where were they hiding?!!??).

The 100 Year Company

Next up was Perry Belcher with a presentation called “100 Year Company“. Intriguing title, so let’s see what it was all about. Here’s the 30,000 foot overview:

Overall, Perry was giving us the information we needed to build a long-term business, and here are the main points I took out of this:

  • Why do companies fail?
    • lack of vision
    • lack of leadership
    • lack of commitment
    • lack of scalability
    • no metrics
    • poor management
    • flawed model
  • What makes great companies great?
    • great leaders (should be fair, calm, inspirational, mentors)
    • competitive advantage (fast mover, price, USP (unique selling proposition), selection, legal) = your unfair advantage
    • measurement (great companies know their metrics and are constantly on top of them – product performance, employee performance, customer success)
    • seek opportunity for growth (international, cross markets, joint ventures, expand product offering)
    • take advantage of leverage (other people’s money, ideas, energy, trust, innovation)
    • ethics of the highest order (customer care, employee success,  partner success, charitable giving)
    • urgency and commitment (money loves speed, speed attracts talent, talent drives innovation, innovation drives value)
  • Reasons your business may be stuck:
    • lack of marketing
    • lack of talent
    • lack of systems
    • lack of capital
  • Only 3 ways to grow a business:
    • get more customers (trade shows, SEO, joint ventures, direct mail, Facebook ads, etc.)
    • increase profits per sale (upsell, cross-sell, bundle)
    • increase frequency (stay in touch (email, newsletter, etc.), continuity billing, loyalty programs (free stuff, frequent buyer discounts), line extensions (sell more of what customers want (use joint ventures))

If you grow your business to a size that makes it a market leader, the sky’s the limit. The best part of having a successful business that is of the highest caliber is that you may be in a position to sell it for potentially huge profits.

The moral to this story – GROW A GREAT, SUCCESSFUL COMPANY!

Good stuff, Perry – thanks.

Lunch time now, so Chaim, Alyssia and I went to the mall food court along with one or two others from the conference.

Good Afternoon!

We’re back for the final session of what has been an amazing weekend. This afternoon was going to be all about books and publishing, starting out with a pretty informal chat between Ryan Deiss and a fellow I’d never heard of before, Tucker Max. It seems he originally made his name by writing funny, sensational and nakedly honest emails to friends, who in turn shared them with other friends, resulting in viral emails that eventually provided him with online “infamy”!

What I found out was that, although Tucker Max did his best to come over as an obnoxious, brainless half-wit only interested in beer, women and hangovers (not that I’m saying there’s anything wrong with those interests!), he turned out to be a very funny, intelligent and engaging fellow, who figured out his niche and how to market it and ended up being extremely successful at it. He gave some great advice on how to use books to build brand and media awareness and also to build a publishing empire.

The final session featured published author Guy Kawasaki talking about “The Art Of Publishing“.

Here’s a synopsis of Guy’s presentation:

  • There are 3 phases in publishing a book:
    1. Author
    2. Publisher
    3. Entrepreneur
  • Write for the right reasons – enrich people’s lives, further a cause, meet an intellectual challenge
  • Give people a reason to care about your book
  • Use word doc to compose your book
  • Write everyday – half a page a day
  • Build your market platform – be a curator and an expert; spend a couple of hours on social media (Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.)
  • Start with a Kindle ebook – getting published on Amazon is key
  • Tap the crowd – have your followers review your content in all its stages (outline, manuscript, PDF finished product)
  • Get the name and email address of anyone offering a review – build your contact list
  • Hire a copy editor
  • Hire a cover designer
  • Test your ebook
  • NEVER GIVE UP!

What a great way to end the weekend! Guy was a superb speaker – very engaging and inspiring and he made getting published and establishing a business on Kindle not only doable for anybody but also a lot less intimidating than many of us may have previously thought.

 

And in the end…..

This was a great weekend of great, potentially life-changing information during which I met and learned from some amazing people. It was brilliant meeting up with Chaim and Alyssa and I hope we managed to stay in touch and maybe get to work together on some projects where we implement some of the things we learned over this weekend.

 

Time to grab a cup of Peet’s coffee and then head off into the sunset and start thinking about all the possibilities this weekend brought up.

 

Onward and upward before the next marketing conference!

 

I hope you enjoyed this article and this series and perhaps learned one or two things from what I learned. So, what did you learn? Let me know – I’d love to hear from you. Even if it was just the fact that you never want to go to an internet marketing conference yourself (I hope that’s not the case, but, if it is, feel free to tell me and the rest of the community here)!

 

 

Filed under: EventsInternet Marketing

Like this post? Subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more!